French Violin by SampleScience 0 (0)

French Violin is a beautiful multi-sampled violin with a lot of character and charm. Played to sound authentic, French Violin has a very warm and natural sound. It’s the perfect violin plugin to add a touch of strings to your music production without using GBs of hard drive space.

French Violin comes with 6 articulations: arco vibrato, arco non-vibrato, pizzicato vibrato, pizzicato non-vibrato, spiccato, and tremolo.

Features:

  • 6 articulations.
  • One sample per note.
  • Multi-LFO.
  • Room reverb.
  • Low CPU usage.
  • Highpass/Lowpass filter.
  • Amplitude range controls.
  • 3 voice modes: polyphonic, monophonic, and legato.

Requirements:

  • Windows 8.1/10 or macOS El Capitan to Mojave (not compatible with Catalina and up).
  • 185 MB of HD space.
  • 2GHz Quad-core CPU or better with 4 GB of RAM or more.
  • 64-bit VSTi/AUi Host.

https://www.samplescience.info/2021/07/french-violin.html

Remote Violin (nano) by Alejandro Magaña Martinez[Kontakt] 0 (0)

Introducing a brand new Kontakt instrument: Remote Violin nano!

While this is not the first string instrument Acousmatic Sounds has built, it is the first to be released to the public.

The Remote Violin nano is cozy, screechy and oddly intimate. You will find four different sliders and two knobs, all CC assignable, that control the direct audio (recorded by a regular iPhone), two “interference” signals and a reverb created by a less than ideal reverb pedal!

Depending on where the Remote Violin nano will sit in your mix, the high end can be harsh at times, nothing that a low pass filter cannot fix. However, if you are after a more lo-fi feel, you can let the instrument’s natural top end shine through.

Two panning knobs give you extra control over this instrument, making it easier ad more interesting to create string textures and pads.

https://www.alejandromaganamusic.com/acousmaticsounds/Remote-Violin-nano-p307177542?fbclid=IwAR2bDTvBhA67rMoqhS3SCj8NQTJhOC-InemmMSK42gDDT2f03NgqdGS1kSA

Remote Violin nano

 

Decent Samples Slinky Violin v1.0.1 KONTAKT SFZ DECENT SAMPLER [FREE] 0 (0)

Throughout the years, I’ve owned several guitar amps with built-in spring reverb, and I’ve always loved that twangy, metallic sound. Spring reverb in electric guitar amps works by taking the signal from a guitar’s pickups, amplifying it, passing it into one end of a long coil, picking it up at the other end, and then amplifying that signal some more. Because the internal coil is long and twisty, the sound waves don’t travel directly from one end of the reverb tank to another, but instead take their time and bounce around. This produces the characteristic reverb effect we’ve all come to know and love.

I’ve always wondered what a violin would sound like if it were subjected to a similar treatment. Of course, an acoustic violin is a bit more analog than an electric guitar – there is no pickup – which raises the question: what if you were to attach the spring directly to the body of the instrument you were trying to add reverb to? After seeing a Simon the Magpie Youtube video in which Simon attempted a similar experiment on his acoustic guitar, I knew exactly what I had to do. You can watch my experiment unfold in the video linked above.

(And yes, I’ve since replaced the slinky I stole from my son.)