C-C- -01 by Christopher Carmichael – KVR Challenge 0 (0)

 

Quickly, I’ll tell you (so you don’t necessarily have to read the more detailed version with good technical stuff and known issues, below, but it should help you), the C-C- -01 is a Signal Enhancer. It can:

  • EQ/Filter (7-bands).
  • Peak Follow (with RMS, Oscillators, and Noise also, and also change the Oscillators’ sound response curve going into the Oscillators Peak Followers, and change both response curves for both Peak Followed signals), and change the signal’s Attack and Decay moderately.
  • Wet-Dry.
  • Blend RMS and the Peak Follower.
  • Blend Saturation and the previous EQd, Filtered, and Peak Followed Signal.
  • Subtract the EQ and Filtering from each previous signal at each EQ band, and/or subtract the entire EQ process from before Equalization, and use “Non-EQd Makeup” controls to boost back (and beyond), in parallel, the remaining signals after the EQd signal was subtracted.
  • Oversample.
  • Saturate.
  • Use dual-bands, can split Stereo signal into Mid/Side, all things can be manipulated per channel.
  • Use Linked Controls.

Also, sorry, but some of the things in the About DOC that comes with the plug-in are slightly inaccurate, some things I don’t describe properly. Most, if not all of the corrections are listed on this page.

I’m no coding or programming genius, I just use SynthEdit and connect the wires, and do some basic things. Now for the more technical, more in-depth version (below).

Key Features/Notes/Known Issues/Problems, and some things you can do with the C-C- -01:

  • I cannot fix DAW/Host compatibility issues, that might be a SynthEdit problem. Also, Automation Parameter names may not completely show inside of some DAW/Hosts.
  • All Parameter Automations have not been tested, some have, I did this only because all controls of themselves have been tested during the testing and development phase. I cannot fix Parameter Automation problems if they arise, unless there is a setting I’ve missed in the internal working of SynthEdit, maybe I can fix that. I’ve plugged in all of the SynthEdit signal wires properly, as far as I know.
  • Has Peak Following (with a 2nd Peak Follower using Oscillators and Noise), RMS (for both Peak Followers), EQ/Filters (with a added subtractive process that subtracts the EQ’d signal from it’s predecessor, and allows you to blend back in the remaining signal, plus add a boost of that signal, or just use the subtractors on the whole EQ process, and then use the LMeqs and RSeqs sliders to blend back that remaining signal from before the entire EQ process, or a combination of the two sets of blend-back sliders for creative effects. I call this process “Non-EQd Makeup” on the plug-in GUI, above those blend-back slider controls), and Saturation.
  • Peak Follower 1 (called Peak Follower in the plug-in) operates on the Main Input Signal, after EQ/Filters. Peak Follower2 also operates on the Main Input Signal, after EQ/Filters, using the Oscillators/Noise. Both Peak Followers modulate (I think that’s the term) the volume control of separate sets of VCAs, one after the other (the 1st Peak Follower’s VCAs to the 2nd one’s VCAs), for each Peak Following process.
  • Has Left/Right and Mid/Side Input Signal Selection.
  • Has linked controls (internally, not on screen, also the Oscillators section has no linked controls), as well as fully independent control of both signal halves throughout most of the plug-in. Use the Left/Mid set of controls when using linked controls.
  • Has volume response curve options for both halves of the signal (see additional notes below for more about this).
  • 7-band EQ: 6 bands of Biquad modules, band 7 is a Band Shelf Mid Range Boost/Cut. The EQ processing order is: EQ1 to EQ7, consecutively.
  • Wet/Dry mix for the entire FX process, as well as a Saturation blend and an RMS to Peak Follower blend per Peak Follower.
  • Has Oversampling up to 32x, and FIR type.
  • Has Channel On/Offs to isolate your signal.
  • Use the Input Trim and Drive Controls to find the sweet spot on each of the 3 Saturators, and make up gain lost or boosted using the Effects Makeup Gain, so you can compare the before and after of the whole FX process. Drive your Sides signal into Saturator 1 at 30% Wet while pushing the Mids into Saturator 3 at 70% Wet for smoother, more subtle distortion/saturation sounds (Hypothetically speaking. each Saturator is different, and may still have a harsher edge to it, also depending on your setting, but this process helps to smooth that out a bit).
  • (Also hypothetical, depending on your sound’s frequency range) Use a Notch Filter to cut an area, then boost back its’ remaining predecessor signal to get rid of some of those “nasal-y” artifacts, careful though, too much can almost ruin your sound. I think some phase shifting can occur, but I have not examined that. Creative effects can be found by randomly moving and setting the Non-EQd Makeup sliders before/while EQing. In one instance, I tried cutting a large amount (-60 db) using a Peak EQ Type with an average to moderate Q setting (I think the Q was somewhere in the range of .2 to 10), then boosting the Non-EQd Makeup in moderate to large amounts, and the effect was good.
  • Be careful when using the Oscillator Monitor Function, the volume may be intensely loud. Be sure to set your volumes low before you turn on the Oscillator Monitor. It is there to let you set a balance, if you want, but you can really push the volume into the Peak Followers if you want, but you probably don’t want to monitor that louder sound, it’s very distorted, and Oscillator waves at low, mid-range, and high frequencies might damage your ears (maybe all of them can actually, I actually don’t know, and I’m no expert). The real effect was designed for the Peak Follower, so no Oscillator sounds are actually heard when using it for it’s intended purpose, but you can hear the effect on the audio, it subtly equalizes and can boost clarity in your signal. Try a Sine at 1500 Hz on one channel and some Pink Noise on the other and you will hear for yourself. Try the Decay at max (about 5 o’clock) for more body. At the shortest Attack and Decay settings, transients can be more audible with a greater clarity of energy, but not drastically, depending on the setting. At the longest settings, smoother, bigger sounds are achieved. Add RMS and change the Rate Control to hear the difference, and blend between the Peak Follower before the RMS using the RMS Blend control for a natural balance. It is subtle. Use White Noise and Pink Noise together in a Mid/Side configuration to have the Peak Follower put Pink Noise on just the Sides signal, and White Noise on the Mids, and you can balance the volume going into the Peak Follower (it is just subtle to hear it), but when using Oscillator waves (Sine, Saw, etc.) near or at the same frequency and volume (in Mid/Side mode) you may notice more of a Left or Right balance to your signal, I believe since the Oscillators are Mono, not Stereo. I included one Oscillator for each signal half. So, Oscillator wave types and/or frequencies far enough away from each other should give a Mid/Side signal a chance of being encoded/decoded by the process, which means for more fun in your Peak Following. The White and Pink Noise seems to always work in Stereo or Mid/Side, though.
  • The Peak Meters may be slightly inaccurate, they show the level below clipping, while it may be that the signal is just clipping a bit. Sorry. As far as I’ve seen it’s only on very quick, loud peaks that it won’t show, otherwise it seems fairly accurate (compared to my DAWs meters, it is just a little below), but I’m no expert. I’m not quite sure how to fix this.
  • The Main Panel’s bottom left features a set of VCA Response Curve choices (I forgot to label them, sorry, you’ll see the words, Decibel when you load the plug-in), they apply only to the Main Signal’s 1st Peak Follower (called Peak Follower on the plug-in GUI, it’s the one that doesn’t use Oscillators). All of the Standard Volume knobs throughout the plug-in have the VCA Response set to the Decibel Curve. I couldn’t decide if I should change that, and I also didn’t have room to give another set of options for you to choose that. I think it’s best if you all can choose it, so I plan to add it later, in a newer version someday, with more Oscillators also.
  • Currently, there’s no internal preset browser. I have not tested whether the Save as .VSTPRESET option in a DAW/Host works. I believe it should. I have experienced issues, in a plug-in created using an older version of SynthEdit, where a saved DAW/Host version of a .VSTPRESET would not be recalled in a project, for some reason, I do not know the reason why though. I don’t know if that issue is present here, or if it’s even a SynthEdit problem at all, it could be that my DAW/Host version is older.

Made with SynthEdit, using only available modules and settings, not coded by myself at all.

https://www.kvraudio.com/product/c-c—01-by-christopher-carmichael

Bam Dorner – Oderbruch 3 (1)

Das knapp 60 km lange und 12–20 km breite Oderbruch erstreckt sich zwischen den Städten Oderberg und Bad Freienwalde im Nordwesten und Lebus im Südosten. Zweitgrößter Zufluss nach der Oder — zugleich größter Nebenfluss der Oder — ist die Warthe, die gut 10 km nach deren Eintritt ins Oderbruch einmündet. Im Westen wird das Oderbruch durch die Hochflächen des Barnim und des Landes Lebus begrenzt, in deren Hanglage sich die Städte Wriezen und Seelow befinden. Die östliche Begrenzung bilden das Neumärkische Hügelland und die Wartheniederung. Unter Ausschluss der Neuenhagener Insel hat das Oderbruch zwischen Reitwein und Hohensaaten eine Gesamtfläche von 920 km². Westlich des Flusses ist es seit Mitte des 18. Jahrhunderts ein Flusspolder, während sich auf den 17 % der Fläche am Ostufer, heute in Polen gelegen, das ursprüngliche Feuchtgebiet erhalten hat. Der Boden des Oderbruchs bildet eine sehr schwach geneigte Ebene und fällt von 14 m im Südosten auf einen Meter Meeresniveau im Nordwesten ab. Der tief gelegene nur 2–6 km breite Teil westlich des Neuenhagener Sporns wird Niederes Oderbruchgenannt.


The Oderbruch, which is almost 60 km long and 12–20 km wide, stretches between the towns of Oderberg and Bad Freienwalde in the northwest and Lebus in the southeast. The second largest tributary after the Oder — at the same time the largest tributary of the Oder — is the Warta, which flows into the Oderbruch a good 10 km after its entrance. In the west, the Oderbruch is bordered by the high plateaus of the Barnim and the Land Lebus, on whose slopes the towns of Wriezen and Seelow are located. The eastern border is formed by the Neumärkische Hügelland and the Wartheniederung. Excluding the Neuenhagen Island, the Oderbruch between Reitwein and Hohensaaten has a total area of 920 km². To the west of the river it has been a river polder since the middle of the 18th century, while on the 17% of the area on the eastern bank, now located in Poland, the original wetland has been preserved. The bottom of the Oderbruch forms a very gently sloping plain, dropping from 14 m in the southeast to one meter sea level in the northwest. The low-lying part west of the Neuenhagen spur, which is only 2-6 km wide, is called Niederes Oderbruch.

© Bam Dorner Productions 2002

DDMF phi-L Audio Tube Preamp v2.0.2 x64 x86 VST VST3 AU AAX WiN MAC [FREE] 0 (0)

What is it?
This tube preamp emulation has been developed Philipp Bulling as a thesis work. Philipp has been offering the plugin in VST format for some time on his own website. He has now moved on to new areas for some time already but didn’t want to let down his users. Hence, DDMF took over the code and will continue to offer the plugin as freeware, with the intent to further improve it and maybe add some more bells and whistles in the future.

The plugin is very unique in the sense that it gives you full control over all aspects of the modelled circuit. All values of all the capacitors, resistors etc. can be tuned by the user. Here is what Philipp had written on the original page.

AbstractSince the sound of an analogue tube amplifier has always exerted a strong fascination, electrical circuits with tubes play a certain role in the world of audio engineering up to now. On the other hand, audio technology becomes more and more digitised. In many cases, digital models emulate real devices in such a way that differences in sound are hardly audible. In this work a model is developed which is able to emulate the typical sound of a tube amplifier on digital devices. Here the main focus is on preamplifiers with triodes, since they have a particular influence to the sound.

Based on the physical properties of real tubes, a tube model is developed first. This mathematical model includes results of theoretical studies as well as analysis of data sheets. The model is then used to implement an entire amplifier circuit. In addition to the tube itself amplifier circuits contain several passive elements. In the domain of digital signal processing the latter are described by finite difference equations, which are solved recursively.

The resulting algorithm is finally implemented as an audio plugin in order to examine its tonal properties. The behavior of the digital model corresponds satisfactorily to real amplifier circuits. Important sound effects of analogue tube amplifiers can also be attested to the digital model.

Diode modelThe first step was to develop a triode model, based on the characteristic curves of real tubes. In theory, the characteristic curve of a vacuum tube is described by Langmuir-Child’s law. However, it was quickly realised that compared to real tubes, this law is not accurate enough. So a new model has been developed. This model describes a triode as a mathematical function. With the model, it is possible to compute the plate voltage (Upc) as a function of the grid voltage (Ugc), depending on the working resistor (Ra) and the supply voltage (Ub).

The following graph shows this function for a 12AU7 triode with Ra = 10k and Ub = 250V:
DDMF phi-L Audio Tube Preamp v2.0.2 x64 x86 VST VST3 AU AAX WiN MAC [FREE] screenshot
Circuit modelingBased on this model, a plate follower stage was implemented.
DDMF phi-L Audio Tube Preamp v2.0.2 x64 x86 VST VST3 AU AAX WiN MAC [FREE] screenshot
Cathode biasingIn this circuit, cathode biasing is used to adjust the bias point of the tube. This is realised by a resistor (Rc) and a capacitor (Cc), placed between the cathode and ground. The effect of cathode biasing can then be modeled by a simple first order RC low pass filter, with Ic*Rc being the input of the filter, and the cathode voltage (Uc) being the output.

If the input signal jumps for example from 0 V to 5 V, the cathode voltage follows quite similar to the step response of a RC-low pass filter:
DDMF phi-L Audio Tube Preamp v2.0.2 x64 x86 VST VST3 AU AAX WiN MAC [FREE] screenshot
Signal limitingThere are two reasons for signal clipping in this circuit. The first one is caused by the tube itself. If there is a high peak at the negative half-wave of the input signal, the tube can’t amplify the signal anymore since the flow of current is completely cut-off. Thus, the positive half-wave of the output is clipped. This effect can be intensified by a more negative bias point.

Here the bias point of an 12AU7 is at around -12 V:
DDMF phi-L Audio Tube Preamp v2.0.2 x64 x86 VST VST3 AU AAX WiN MAC [FREE] screenshotThe second reason for clipping is caused by grid current. High peaks of the positive half-wave of the input signal make the grid voltage positive compared to the cathode voltage. In this case electrons are attracted by the grid. The grid current causes a voltage drop at the internal resistance of the previous stage, which limits the input signal. The following figure shows the effect. The grid voltage is obtained by shifting down the input signal (Uin) by the cathode voltage (Uc). In the upper picture the maximum grid voltage (Ugc) is ~ 0 V compared to the cathode. Hence, there is no grid current. In the lower picture the input signal has an amplitude of 10 V. At the positive peaks of the input signal the grid voltage rises above 0 V (compared to the cathode). The grid current begins to flow and clips the grid voltage.

https://ddmf.eu/phi-L-Audio-Tube-Preamp/

DDMF.phi-L.v2.0.2

Inphonik free bitcrusher effect PCM2612 plugin for Windows, macOS, GNU/Linux, and iOS 0 (0)

 

Inphonik has announced the release of a free bitcrusher effect plugin for Windows, macOS, GNU/Linux, and iOS.

Meet the PCM2612 Retro Decimator Unit, a bitcrusher effect plug-in with a distinctive legacy. Based on the work we made on the RYM2612 Iconic FM Synthesizer, our tribute emulation of the Sega Genesis sound chip, the 8-bit decimation is inherited from the FM synth’s PCM playback feature, packed in a simple and compact effect unit. Bonus: it’s free!

The effect is available in 64-bit VST/VST3, AU and AAX plugin formats, as a Rack Extension for Reason 10.1 and higher, and as an AUv3/IAA app for iOS.

https://www.inphonik.com/products/pcm2612-retro-decimator-unit/

PCM2612 1.0.0 Setup

PCM2612 1.0.0 Installer

PCM2612_1.0.0_Linux.tar