Ocean Swift Synthesis – Wavetable Synthesis Pack 1 WAV [FREE] 0 (0)

OSS Wavetable Synthesis Pack I is a Big collection of Morphing Wavetables and Single cycle Waveforms in many shapes and sizes for a friendly price! Download Wavetables and Waveforms for Xfer Serum, Kontakt, Codex, Surge, Ableton Live, Dune 2 and 3, Defiant WT, Reaktor, MUX Modular, KV331 Audio Synthmaster, VCV Seven Seas and many other Wavetable Synthesizers & Software OSS Wavetable Synthesis Pack will take your sound design to a different dimension

The pack includes both single cycle Waveforms as well as complete Stitched/Morphed Wavetables with multiple cycles. There are 28 Stitched/Morphing Wavetables. Some are made using our offered single cycle files and some are made from cycles entirely unique to each stitched/morphed Wavetable. Most of the stitched/morphed Wavetables include between 64-100 cycles. There are over 2500 cycles in the morphing tables when you count them all together.

All of the wavetables and waveforms are offered in ALL conventional cycle size formats used in wavetable synths – 128, 256, 512, 1024 and 2048 cycle sizes.

There are over 1500 single cycles. For the single cycles, some of the files come in 256 sample size and some in 2048 sample size.

All the files are in *.wav format and in 441000 sampling rate. Some of the files are 16bit and some are 24bit.

The pack also includes 15 “remixed” stitched tables as a small bonus – mixed versions of the various stitched tables with each other. These remix tables come in 2048 cycle size

Compatible with Wavetable Synths
Download Wavetables and Waveforms for Xfer Serum, Kontakt, Codex, Surge, Ableton Live, Dune 2 and 3, Defiant WT, Reaktor, MUX Modular, KV331 Audio Synthmaster, VCV Seven Seas and many other Wavetable Synthesizers & Software

https://oceanswift.net/wavetablesynthesispack1/

ocean_swift_wavetable_synthesist_pack_1

 

Heavyocity FREE Production Loops 2020 KONTAKT WAV REX [FREE] 0 (0)

Free Production Loops 2020 was built entirely from the drums and percussion found in Damage 2, a cinematic percussion instrument library for Native Instruments Kontakt. It includes 96 straight and triplet loops, covering a wide range of heavy-hitting and aggressive drum sounds. All of these loops are exclusive and newly released material, they’re not found in Damage 2.

What’s included in Free Production Loops 2020
• Unleash the EPIC with FREE LOOPS, built entirely from the drums and percussion found in Damage 2.
• 96 straight & triplet loops, covering a wide range of heavy-hitting and aggressive drum sounds.
• These Loops are NOT contained in Damage 2.
• Delivered as WAV & REX files. Kontakt FULL format also included.

Tech Specs:
• 453 MB uncompressed
• Presented in WAV, REX, and NKI (Kontakt FULL) Formats
• 48 Straight Loops (12 Full Mix, 12 Low, 12 Mid, and 12 High)

NKI Version Requirements
• Kontakt 6.4.2 FULL ONLY or later
Minimum System Requirements
• Mac: macOS 10.12, 10.13, 10.14, or 10.15 (latest update), i5, 4 GB Ram
• PC: Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10 (latest Service Pack), Intel Core i5 or equivalent CPU, 2 GB RAM

https://heavyocity.com/product/free-production-loops-2020/

Decent Samples Slinky Violin v1.0.1 KONTAKT SFZ DECENT SAMPLER [FREE] 0 (0)

Throughout the years, I’ve owned several guitar amps with built-in spring reverb, and I’ve always loved that twangy, metallic sound. Spring reverb in electric guitar amps works by taking the signal from a guitar’s pickups, amplifying it, passing it into one end of a long coil, picking it up at the other end, and then amplifying that signal some more. Because the internal coil is long and twisty, the sound waves don’t travel directly from one end of the reverb tank to another, but instead take their time and bounce around. This produces the characteristic reverb effect we’ve all come to know and love.

I’ve always wondered what a violin would sound like if it were subjected to a similar treatment. Of course, an acoustic violin is a bit more analog than an electric guitar – there is no pickup – which raises the question: what if you were to attach the spring directly to the body of the instrument you were trying to add reverb to? After seeing a Simon the Magpie Youtube video in which Simon attempted a similar experiment on his acoustic guitar, I knew exactly what I had to do. You can watch my experiment unfold in the video linked above.

(And yes, I’ve since replaced the slinky I stole from my son.)